Event Title

MERO-ATB

Location

CoLab, OCB 100

Start Date

27-4-2018 12:00 PM

Document Type

Poster

Description

Many of the most widely used antibiotics have come out of the dirt. Antibiotics have been used to fight against infections. In this research project, bacteria was collected and isolated from soil found in local environment that could produce a new antibiotic.In a focus that using soil with a neutral pH will allow for an abundant and diverse environment that could be secondary metabolic producing bacteria. A soil sample was collected from a backyard in merriam KS at a depth of about 4 inches on a sunny day with a pH of 7. Bacterial colonies from the soil were transferred and isolated by dilution technique. Results were used to calculate the number of colonies forming units in the soil. Bacterial colonies that showed zone of inhibition were further isolated on agar plate by sub-culturing. Potential candidates that seemed to produce secondary metabolites were used in antibiotics screening to determine the bacteria’s ability to inhibit other bacteria growth.The amplified DNA will be send to a sequencing facility at Harvard University for sequencing and genetic analysis. Result, discussion and conclusion will be added after the completion of the project.

Comments

The faculty member for this project was Jamie Cunningham, Biology.

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Apr 27th, 12:00 PM

MERO-ATB

CoLab, OCB 100

Many of the most widely used antibiotics have come out of the dirt. Antibiotics have been used to fight against infections. In this research project, bacteria was collected and isolated from soil found in local environment that could produce a new antibiotic.In a focus that using soil with a neutral pH will allow for an abundant and diverse environment that could be secondary metabolic producing bacteria. A soil sample was collected from a backyard in merriam KS at a depth of about 4 inches on a sunny day with a pH of 7. Bacterial colonies from the soil were transferred and isolated by dilution technique. Results were used to calculate the number of colonies forming units in the soil. Bacterial colonies that showed zone of inhibition were further isolated on agar plate by sub-culturing. Potential candidates that seemed to produce secondary metabolites were used in antibiotics screening to determine the bacteria’s ability to inhibit other bacteria growth.The amplified DNA will be send to a sequencing facility at Harvard University for sequencing and genetic analysis. Result, discussion and conclusion will be added after the completion of the project.