Event Title

Microbiology Soil Sample Project

Location

CoLab, OCB 100

Start Date

27-4-2018 9:00 AM

Document Type

Poster

Description

The purpose of our research in Microbiology is involved with the Small World Initiative Student Research, where students identify potential antibiotic compounds that can be produced from microbes found in soil. Together, soil has been collected by each student from various locations in the area to be tested to see if it inhibits any specific bacteria and under any other conditions. Using an aseptic technique, we transfer our bacteria from our diluted soil sample into different agar plates to identify potential candidates to form a master plate, which contains multiple candidates to be tested that show unique growth. Once we have identified a candidate, we create a screen plate in order to see which ESKAPE pathogen inhibits growth of our bacteria candidate. Once found, a streak plate is created. We proceed to transfer the bacteria using the aseptic technique to glass slides for simple staining and gram staining using the protocols taught in class. We finally utilize a microscope with the slides created from the simple stain and gram stain to identify the properties of the bacteria from our sample. Currently, my own personal soil sample has yet to inhibit any ESKAPE pathogen growth and have had minimal success finding any candidates to test. With the use of other classmates’ candidates, screening of six ESKAPE pathogens has been done to hopefully identify an inhibiting bacterium that can be used for staining. With the use of the multiple techniques it is hopeful that microbes that can be used for new antibiotic innovation.

Comments

The faculty supervisor for this project was Heather Seitz, Biology.

Image

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 27th, 9:00 AM

Microbiology Soil Sample Project

CoLab, OCB 100

The purpose of our research in Microbiology is involved with the Small World Initiative Student Research, where students identify potential antibiotic compounds that can be produced from microbes found in soil. Together, soil has been collected by each student from various locations in the area to be tested to see if it inhibits any specific bacteria and under any other conditions. Using an aseptic technique, we transfer our bacteria from our diluted soil sample into different agar plates to identify potential candidates to form a master plate, which contains multiple candidates to be tested that show unique growth. Once we have identified a candidate, we create a screen plate in order to see which ESKAPE pathogen inhibits growth of our bacteria candidate. Once found, a streak plate is created. We proceed to transfer the bacteria using the aseptic technique to glass slides for simple staining and gram staining using the protocols taught in class. We finally utilize a microscope with the slides created from the simple stain and gram stain to identify the properties of the bacteria from our sample. Currently, my own personal soil sample has yet to inhibit any ESKAPE pathogen growth and have had minimal success finding any candidates to test. With the use of other classmates’ candidates, screening of six ESKAPE pathogens has been done to hopefully identify an inhibiting bacterium that can be used for staining. With the use of the multiple techniques it is hopeful that microbes that can be used for new antibiotic innovation.