Event Title

Looking for an Antibiotic Bacteria

Location

CoLab

Start Date

3-5-2019 10:30 AM

End Date

3-5-2019 11:45 AM

Document Type

Poster

Description

Antibiotics plays a very important role in human health. It has become a source of saving many lives and curing many ill patients. Most of the antibiotics are collected from soil and are found in nature. For this project a soil sample was collected from Overland Park, Kansas, in order to examine and discover antibiotic producing bacteria. The soil sample was examined for colonies of bacteria, using serial dilution. The procedure was repeated under sterile, controlled conditions, in a lab setting. The experiment produced multiple different colonies of bacteria. These colonies were tested and studied under several examinations on how they would respond to highly resistant bacterial species (safe relatives). This procedure was performed to analyze any potential zones of inhibition produced by these bacteria. We studied our sample with Gram staining technique in order to determine if our candidate bacteria is Gram-positive or Gram-negative. More over the candidate will be screened and studied by polymerase chain reactions, (PCR) and gene sequencing techniques in order to further evaluate. Through this process we aim to, find an antibiotic producing bacteria that could potentially benefit our health science community, and hopefully help in the medical field.

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May 3rd, 10:30 AM May 3rd, 11:45 AM

Looking for an Antibiotic Bacteria

CoLab

Antibiotics plays a very important role in human health. It has become a source of saving many lives and curing many ill patients. Most of the antibiotics are collected from soil and are found in nature. For this project a soil sample was collected from Overland Park, Kansas, in order to examine and discover antibiotic producing bacteria. The soil sample was examined for colonies of bacteria, using serial dilution. The procedure was repeated under sterile, controlled conditions, in a lab setting. The experiment produced multiple different colonies of bacteria. These colonies were tested and studied under several examinations on how they would respond to highly resistant bacterial species (safe relatives). This procedure was performed to analyze any potential zones of inhibition produced by these bacteria. We studied our sample with Gram staining technique in order to determine if our candidate bacteria is Gram-positive or Gram-negative. More over the candidate will be screened and studied by polymerase chain reactions, (PCR) and gene sequencing techniques in order to further evaluate. Through this process we aim to, find an antibiotic producing bacteria that could potentially benefit our health science community, and hopefully help in the medical field.