Event Title

Medicine in dirt found in Overland Park

Location

CoLab

Start Date

3-5-2019 10:30 AM

End Date

3-5-2019 11:45 AM

Document Type

Poster

Description

The search to identify harmful pathogenic bacteria is a never-ending hunt. Although much progress has been made, and many beneficial bacterial species are identified through research. Some of these identified bacterial species have led to some of the world’s greatest cures and treatment medications. The world we live in is much vaster and denser than we think, when observing the presence of bacterial species in our environment. While bacteria are found in just about every place on this planet, the dirt used in this set of experiments was obtained from a sloped front yard in southern Overland Park, Kansas. The dirt this sample was obtained from was initially wet, cold, and hard; therefore, it was harvested from about an inch deep into the topsoil, which was covered in slushy ice. In this dirt, through a long process of careful steps, two potential candidates, for antibiotic resistance, may be present with the help of more research. Of the two plates, candidate number three and candidate number five showed small areas of inhibition around the growing colonies and stopped the growth of some surrounding colonies, resulting in a promising experiment in an attempt to identify and isolate these specific bacteria.

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May 3rd, 10:30 AM May 3rd, 11:45 AM

Medicine in dirt found in Overland Park

CoLab

The search to identify harmful pathogenic bacteria is a never-ending hunt. Although much progress has been made, and many beneficial bacterial species are identified through research. Some of these identified bacterial species have led to some of the world’s greatest cures and treatment medications. The world we live in is much vaster and denser than we think, when observing the presence of bacterial species in our environment. While bacteria are found in just about every place on this planet, the dirt used in this set of experiments was obtained from a sloped front yard in southern Overland Park, Kansas. The dirt this sample was obtained from was initially wet, cold, and hard; therefore, it was harvested from about an inch deep into the topsoil, which was covered in slushy ice. In this dirt, through a long process of careful steps, two potential candidates, for antibiotic resistance, may be present with the help of more research. Of the two plates, candidate number three and candidate number five showed small areas of inhibition around the growing colonies and stopped the growth of some surrounding colonies, resulting in a promising experiment in an attempt to identify and isolate these specific bacteria.