Event Title

Stability Assessment of 3 Major DeForest Formation Soils

Location

CoLab

Start Date

3-5-2019 1:30 PM

End Date

3-5-2019 2:45 PM

Document Type

Poster

Description

Streambank collapse, and the resultant deposit of debris into watersheds, has led to a growing problem of “silting” in the midwestern United States. Soil from collapsed bank material makes its way downstream to gradually fill reservoirs and lakes. The Gunder Member, Honey Creek Member, and Robert’s Creek Member are 3 different alluvium (waterborne sediment) deposits of the DeForest Formation, a large layer of alluvial soils found throughout the midwest. These members make up many stream and river banks across the midwest, and are therefore often considered in stabilization projects and other construction activities. The focus of this project is to test if any one of these members, at any given place, will be as stable as one at a different location, thereby allowing a standardized set of measurements to be used to describe a member’s stability at any location.

Image

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 3rd, 1:30 PM May 3rd, 2:45 PM

Stability Assessment of 3 Major DeForest Formation Soils

CoLab

Streambank collapse, and the resultant deposit of debris into watersheds, has led to a growing problem of “silting” in the midwestern United States. Soil from collapsed bank material makes its way downstream to gradually fill reservoirs and lakes. The Gunder Member, Honey Creek Member, and Robert’s Creek Member are 3 different alluvium (waterborne sediment) deposits of the DeForest Formation, a large layer of alluvial soils found throughout the midwest. These members make up many stream and river banks across the midwest, and are therefore often considered in stabilization projects and other construction activities. The focus of this project is to test if any one of these members, at any given place, will be as stable as one at a different location, thereby allowing a standardized set of measurements to be used to describe a member’s stability at any location.