Event Title

Soiled It

Start Date

28-4-2022 9:00 AM

Document Type

Poster

Description

In our ever evolving world of medicine, we have made enormous strides especially within the last few centuries saving millions of lives with the discovery of antibiotics. However, with the overuse and misuse of antibiotics, the efficacy of these bug killing drugs has begun to decline. Dangerous superbugs known as E.S.K.A.P.E. pathogens have become virtually resistant to all known antibiotics leaving those who contract these bugs with little to no hope of surviving.The rapid surge in antibiotic resistance bacteria has become a global issue due to the lack of funding for pharmaceutical research needed to discover a new antibiotic. This semester I have decided to take matters into my own hands to identify new soil bacteria that may be a solution to this expanding problem. By collecting soil samples and methods of serial dilution, a master plate was created to test bacterial isolates against E.S.K.A.P.E. pathogen relatives in hopes of identifying species that display antimicrobial properties. Due to the early nature of this abstract, final data and results will be reported during the spring symposium.

Comments

The faculty mentor for this project was Angela Consani, Biology.

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Apr 28th, 9:00 AM

Soiled It

In our ever evolving world of medicine, we have made enormous strides especially within the last few centuries saving millions of lives with the discovery of antibiotics. However, with the overuse and misuse of antibiotics, the efficacy of these bug killing drugs has begun to decline. Dangerous superbugs known as E.S.K.A.P.E. pathogens have become virtually resistant to all known antibiotics leaving those who contract these bugs with little to no hope of surviving.The rapid surge in antibiotic resistance bacteria has become a global issue due to the lack of funding for pharmaceutical research needed to discover a new antibiotic. This semester I have decided to take matters into my own hands to identify new soil bacteria that may be a solution to this expanding problem. By collecting soil samples and methods of serial dilution, a master plate was created to test bacterial isolates against E.S.K.A.P.E. pathogen relatives in hopes of identifying species that display antimicrobial properties. Due to the early nature of this abstract, final data and results will be reported during the spring symposium.