Event Title

Tiny Earth Project

Start Date

28-4-2022 10:30 AM

Document Type

Poster

Description

This experiment has gained significance in conjunction with the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens such as MRSA and other bacteria. We know that millions of bacteria have yet to be discovered in the soil and may possess antibiotic-producing capabilities. It may be possible to identify new antibiotics by examining soil samples from various locations, including my backyard, to combat the rise of antibiotic-resistant pathogens. The objective of my project is to identify new microbial life strains that are capable of producing antibiotics that suppress the growth of ESKAPE infections in soil samples. An initial soil sample was taken, and dilutions were made through serial diluting of the sample. Multiple master plates were made to narrow down my candidates. Since ESKAPE pathogens are a threat to human safety, 'safe-relatives' were used instead to perform the experiments and procedures. To test my candidate for antibiotic inhibiting factors, I created multiple screening plates with the ESKAPE pathogens: E. coli, A. bayly, Entero. facecacalis, Entero. aerogenes, Staph. epidermidis, and Pseudo. putida. My candidate showed inhibition against Staph epidermidis, Psuedo putida, and Entero facacalis, Although, my candidate was inconclusive against A. bayly, due to the presence of background media. Once I had selected a candidate, I created a series of streak plates to make pure isolated colonies. When I had distinct colonies, I could confirm my candidate's morphology showed round and smooth margins, a slight elevation, and dark yellow coloring. As a result of a Gram stain, I discovered that my colony was a gram-negative bacillus.

Comments

The faculty mentor for this project was Matt Ducote, Biology .

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Apr 28th, 10:30 AM

Tiny Earth Project

This experiment has gained significance in conjunction with the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens such as MRSA and other bacteria. We know that millions of bacteria have yet to be discovered in the soil and may possess antibiotic-producing capabilities. It may be possible to identify new antibiotics by examining soil samples from various locations, including my backyard, to combat the rise of antibiotic-resistant pathogens. The objective of my project is to identify new microbial life strains that are capable of producing antibiotics that suppress the growth of ESKAPE infections in soil samples. An initial soil sample was taken, and dilutions were made through serial diluting of the sample. Multiple master plates were made to narrow down my candidates. Since ESKAPE pathogens are a threat to human safety, 'safe-relatives' were used instead to perform the experiments and procedures. To test my candidate for antibiotic inhibiting factors, I created multiple screening plates with the ESKAPE pathogens: E. coli, A. bayly, Entero. facecacalis, Entero. aerogenes, Staph. epidermidis, and Pseudo. putida. My candidate showed inhibition against Staph epidermidis, Psuedo putida, and Entero facacalis, Although, my candidate was inconclusive against A. bayly, due to the presence of background media. Once I had selected a candidate, I created a series of streak plates to make pure isolated colonies. When I had distinct colonies, I could confirm my candidate's morphology showed round and smooth margins, a slight elevation, and dark yellow coloring. As a result of a Gram stain, I discovered that my colony was a gram-negative bacillus.