Event Title

Antibiotic vs Bacteria: The Race Against Resistance

Location

CoLab, OCB 100

Start Date

27-4-2018 9:00 AM

Document Type

Poster

Description

Antibiotics are an important tool that help combat pathogenic bacteria. However, with the overuse of these tools many bacterial pathogens have evolved for their own survival and developed resistance. Without discovery of new antibiotics, we are unable to keep up with the resistance that causes “Superbugs”. With low profits for antibiotics, big pharmaceutical companies have lost interest in their funding. Leading to the goal of my research project; the discovery of new antibiotics. Because many of the most regularly used antibiotics come from bacteria found in soil, I collected a soil sample from Frisko Lake in Olathe Kansas. By diluting this soil sample, I was able to isolate bacteria and collect favorable candidates for antibiotic testing. I tested multiple antibiotic candidates against several species of bacteria, looking for signs that it killed or inhibited its growth. To identify, candidates were characterized using staining, DNA sequencing, and metabolic and biochemical testing and compared against familiar bacteria. While the discovery of a new antibiotic would be useful in our battle against bacterial infections, research shows, the overuse and mistreatment of it will only lead to eventual resistance. It will be an ongoing struggle of antibiotics versus pathogenic bacteria.

Comments

The faculty supervisor for this project was Jon Kniss, Biology.

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Apr 27th, 9:00 AM

Antibiotic vs Bacteria: The Race Against Resistance

CoLab, OCB 100

Antibiotics are an important tool that help combat pathogenic bacteria. However, with the overuse of these tools many bacterial pathogens have evolved for their own survival and developed resistance. Without discovery of new antibiotics, we are unable to keep up with the resistance that causes “Superbugs”. With low profits for antibiotics, big pharmaceutical companies have lost interest in their funding. Leading to the goal of my research project; the discovery of new antibiotics. Because many of the most regularly used antibiotics come from bacteria found in soil, I collected a soil sample from Frisko Lake in Olathe Kansas. By diluting this soil sample, I was able to isolate bacteria and collect favorable candidates for antibiotic testing. I tested multiple antibiotic candidates against several species of bacteria, looking for signs that it killed or inhibited its growth. To identify, candidates were characterized using staining, DNA sequencing, and metabolic and biochemical testing and compared against familiar bacteria. While the discovery of a new antibiotic would be useful in our battle against bacterial infections, research shows, the overuse and mistreatment of it will only lead to eventual resistance. It will be an ongoing struggle of antibiotics versus pathogenic bacteria.