Event Title

Lakeside Bacteria Demonstrates Antibiotic Potential Against Relatives of Pathogenic Bacteria

Location

CoLab, OCB 100

Start Date

27-4-2018 12:00 PM

Document Type

Poster

Description

The Antibiotic Resistance Crisis has negatively affected millions of people worldwide. Microbes all across the globe are constantly changing and developing resistance. That has rendered some of our past and current antibiotics useless. An increasing need emerges for research into developing new antibiotics to combat the resistance. More specifically with ESKAPE pathogens: multi-drug resistant strains of bacteria that threaten the health of humans especially in hospital settings. In collaboration with the Small World Initiative, the overall objective of this research project is to try to find new potential antibiotics. In this study, soil samples were collected around a Lenexa senior living community lake. The soil underwent multiple serial dilutions and was cultured on 50% TSA agar media plates. After allowing the bacteria to grow, 13 colonies displaying zones of inhibitions were isolated and transferred to master plates. Using a modified spread patch proof plating method, the 13 antimicrobial compound producing bacteria were tested against safe relatives of the ESKAPE pathogens. The bacteria named as “BTS9” inhibited the growth of Pseudomonas putida and Escherichia coli. Quadrant streak plates of BTS9 were then created in order to obtain a pure culture. Metabolic tests will be used to analyze the promising bacteria for secondary metabolites with antibiotic activity along with PCR testing to gain more information. The isolated potential candidate BTS9 will be sent to Yale University for 16s rRNA gene sequencing. Further research will be conducted by other student researchers at JCCC as the battle against antibiotic resistance continues.

Comments

The faculty supervisor for this project was Heather Seitz, Biology.

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Apr 27th, 12:00 PM

Lakeside Bacteria Demonstrates Antibiotic Potential Against Relatives of Pathogenic Bacteria

CoLab, OCB 100

The Antibiotic Resistance Crisis has negatively affected millions of people worldwide. Microbes all across the globe are constantly changing and developing resistance. That has rendered some of our past and current antibiotics useless. An increasing need emerges for research into developing new antibiotics to combat the resistance. More specifically with ESKAPE pathogens: multi-drug resistant strains of bacteria that threaten the health of humans especially in hospital settings. In collaboration with the Small World Initiative, the overall objective of this research project is to try to find new potential antibiotics. In this study, soil samples were collected around a Lenexa senior living community lake. The soil underwent multiple serial dilutions and was cultured on 50% TSA agar media plates. After allowing the bacteria to grow, 13 colonies displaying zones of inhibitions were isolated and transferred to master plates. Using a modified spread patch proof plating method, the 13 antimicrobial compound producing bacteria were tested against safe relatives of the ESKAPE pathogens. The bacteria named as “BTS9” inhibited the growth of Pseudomonas putida and Escherichia coli. Quadrant streak plates of BTS9 were then created in order to obtain a pure culture. Metabolic tests will be used to analyze the promising bacteria for secondary metabolites with antibiotic activity along with PCR testing to gain more information. The isolated potential candidate BTS9 will be sent to Yale University for 16s rRNA gene sequencing. Further research will be conducted by other student researchers at JCCC as the battle against antibiotic resistance continues.