Event Title

Antibiotic Yielding Bacteria (T3) From Lenexa, Kansas

Location

CoLab, OCB 100

Start Date

27-4-2018 12:00 PM

Document Type

Poster

Description

Antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a mounting problem throughout the world. The discovery of new antibiotics is essential in confronting this epidemic issue. The safest and most natural way to obtain bacteria, with the ability to yield new antibiotics, is through the collection of soil samples. Soil samples, in this study, were collected from Lenexa, Kansas along a populated running trail. The soil was studied in a laboratory setting to detect bacteria with the potential of producing antibiotics. Eight bacterial candidates (T1-T8) were identified on a petri dish through serial dilution tests and were then transferred to a master plate. The bacteria (T1-T8) were isolated individually and tested with other tester strains in close proximity. One out of eight possible bacterial strains showed signs of inhibition (T3). T3 showed signs of inhibition against Gram-negative bacteria (Enterobacter aerogenes and Escherichia coli) and was observed to be convex, smooth, round, and white in color. The safe method of obtaining bacteria through soil samples and the properties that T3 exhibits indicates an effective path towards the development of antibiotics that could likely prevent the increase of resistance. Further description of the bacteria (T3) and its antibacterial activity is still being studied and tested in the laboratory at Johnson County Community College, Kansas.

Comments

The faculty supervisor for this project was Jamie Cunningham, Biology.

Image

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 27th, 12:00 PM

Antibiotic Yielding Bacteria (T3) From Lenexa, Kansas

CoLab, OCB 100

Antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a mounting problem throughout the world. The discovery of new antibiotics is essential in confronting this epidemic issue. The safest and most natural way to obtain bacteria, with the ability to yield new antibiotics, is through the collection of soil samples. Soil samples, in this study, were collected from Lenexa, Kansas along a populated running trail. The soil was studied in a laboratory setting to detect bacteria with the potential of producing antibiotics. Eight bacterial candidates (T1-T8) were identified on a petri dish through serial dilution tests and were then transferred to a master plate. The bacteria (T1-T8) were isolated individually and tested with other tester strains in close proximity. One out of eight possible bacterial strains showed signs of inhibition (T3). T3 showed signs of inhibition against Gram-negative bacteria (Enterobacter aerogenes and Escherichia coli) and was observed to be convex, smooth, round, and white in color. The safe method of obtaining bacteria through soil samples and the properties that T3 exhibits indicates an effective path towards the development of antibiotics that could likely prevent the increase of resistance. Further description of the bacteria (T3) and its antibacterial activity is still being studied and tested in the laboratory at Johnson County Community College, Kansas.