Event Title

Using Power Harvesting Techniques to Improve Medical Device Reliability

Location

CoLab, OCB 100

Start Date

27-4-2018 1:30 PM

Document Type

Poster

Description

Hearing aids are devices used to cope with the effects of hearing loss, usually sensorineural hearing loss. This type of hearing loss makes sounds muffled and it can make it harder to understand different sounds especially in noisy environments. There is 48.1 million people in the US with mild or greater than mild hearing loss. But surprisingly, only 24 percent of people with hearing loss have hearing aids. Hearing aids are inconvenient because of their dependence on batteries, there is a social stigma revolving around them, and a quality hearing aid can cost up to five thousand dollars. These are problems with the hearing aid that I set out to solve in my project. I developed marketing techniques through interactions with Rob Neville, CEO of Savara Pharmaceuticals, as well worked with Dr. Paul Thibado from the University of Arkansas through email to develop energy harvesting circuits. My main interests in his research have to do with the fluctuations of freestanding graphene for the use of clean, limitless, renewable energy to power small devices. I am now making arrangements to work with him during the summer.

Comments

The faculty supervisor for this project was J. Douglas Patterson, STEM Scholars.

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Apr 27th, 1:30 PM

Using Power Harvesting Techniques to Improve Medical Device Reliability

CoLab, OCB 100

Hearing aids are devices used to cope with the effects of hearing loss, usually sensorineural hearing loss. This type of hearing loss makes sounds muffled and it can make it harder to understand different sounds especially in noisy environments. There is 48.1 million people in the US with mild or greater than mild hearing loss. But surprisingly, only 24 percent of people with hearing loss have hearing aids. Hearing aids are inconvenient because of their dependence on batteries, there is a social stigma revolving around them, and a quality hearing aid can cost up to five thousand dollars. These are problems with the hearing aid that I set out to solve in my project. I developed marketing techniques through interactions with Rob Neville, CEO of Savara Pharmaceuticals, as well worked with Dr. Paul Thibado from the University of Arkansas through email to develop energy harvesting circuits. My main interests in his research have to do with the fluctuations of freestanding graphene for the use of clean, limitless, renewable energy to power small devices. I am now making arrangements to work with him during the summer.