Event Title

Newly discovered pathogen, Bananateria181, possible inhibitor of Escherichia coli

Location

CoLab, OCB 100

Start Date

27-4-2018 1:30 PM

Document Type

Poster

Description

The ESKAPE PATHOGEN research project helps students like me find potential candidates that inhibit the pathogens that are continuing to grow more resistant to the antibiotics we use everyday. The process of serial diluting the soil found from different areas, plating the dilutions on 50% TSA media, and autoclaving the plates, we are able to then try and find potential candidates that inhibit the safe relatives. A potential candidate on the 10-1 plate was further tested using the cavalier method and was found it inhibited the Escherichia coli virus and a streak plate was made. Finding a new antibiotic for this pathogen would mean we can save more lives and help patients with the illness recover faster. The soil sample from this experiment was taken from the hill in the middle of the JCCC campus on the second step. Continuing this research, means hoping to learn more about the E coli virus and to potentially find new ways to create antibiotics that resist this pathogen.

Comments

The faculty supervisor for this project was Heather Seitz, Biology.

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Apr 27th, 1:30 PM

Newly discovered pathogen, Bananateria181, possible inhibitor of Escherichia coli

CoLab, OCB 100

The ESKAPE PATHOGEN research project helps students like me find potential candidates that inhibit the pathogens that are continuing to grow more resistant to the antibiotics we use everyday. The process of serial diluting the soil found from different areas, plating the dilutions on 50% TSA media, and autoclaving the plates, we are able to then try and find potential candidates that inhibit the safe relatives. A potential candidate on the 10-1 plate was further tested using the cavalier method and was found it inhibited the Escherichia coli virus and a streak plate was made. Finding a new antibiotic for this pathogen would mean we can save more lives and help patients with the illness recover faster. The soil sample from this experiment was taken from the hill in the middle of the JCCC campus on the second step. Continuing this research, means hoping to learn more about the E coli virus and to potentially find new ways to create antibiotics that resist this pathogen.