Event Title

Turning a sample of soil into a new antibiotic drug

Location

CoLab, OCB 100

Start Date

27-4-2018 9:00 AM

Document Type

Poster

Description

For the following experiment, I have taken a soil sample and put it through many procedures in order to eventually have the outcome of finding a new antibiotic. I chose to get my soil sample on the corner of a busy street in Gardner, hoping to find a bacterium produced by all the cars and children that pass by. I took my sample to the lab and used a serial dilution procedure, and plated 6 different agar plates containing different dilutions. After creating a master plate of 12 potential candidates I found on the agars who appeared to have a zone of inhibition, I then tested each candidate against the ESKAPE pathogens. This would show if any of my potential candidates are resistant to the well-known pathogens. Unfortunately, all my results were negative, meaning the soil I had collected doesn’t contain any new antibodies resistant to the ESKAPE pathogens. From then on, I must adopt a new candidate who had a positive result in prohibiting an ESKAPE pathogen. Once this is done, a streak plate is made to confirm that the candidate is a pure culture in order to send if off to the lab for DNA testing.

Comments

The faculty supervisor for this project was Heather Seitz, Biology.

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Apr 27th, 9:00 AM

Turning a sample of soil into a new antibiotic drug

CoLab, OCB 100

For the following experiment, I have taken a soil sample and put it through many procedures in order to eventually have the outcome of finding a new antibiotic. I chose to get my soil sample on the corner of a busy street in Gardner, hoping to find a bacterium produced by all the cars and children that pass by. I took my sample to the lab and used a serial dilution procedure, and plated 6 different agar plates containing different dilutions. After creating a master plate of 12 potential candidates I found on the agars who appeared to have a zone of inhibition, I then tested each candidate against the ESKAPE pathogens. This would show if any of my potential candidates are resistant to the well-known pathogens. Unfortunately, all my results were negative, meaning the soil I had collected doesn’t contain any new antibodies resistant to the ESKAPE pathogens. From then on, I must adopt a new candidate who had a positive result in prohibiting an ESKAPE pathogen. Once this is done, a streak plate is made to confirm that the candidate is a pure culture in order to send if off to the lab for DNA testing.