Event Title

Analysis of Saint John’s Wort Composition with Four Different Solvents: Methylene Chloride, Ethanol, Ethyl Acetate and Ether

Location

CoLab, OCB 100

Start Date

28-4-2017 11:00 AM

End Date

28-4-2017 12:45 PM

Document Type

Poster

Description

Hypericum Perforatum is a medicinal plant with a beautiful yellow flower, native to Europe and most commonly known as St. John’s Wort. This plant has been used for hundreds of years, dating back all the way to the Greek era. It was used as a remedy for cuts, inflammation, bacterial and viral diseases. However, St. Jon’s Wort is most famously known today as a natural antidepressant. St. John’s Wort is used to treat mild to moderate depression. The main active compounds are hypericin and hyperforin. The purpose of this experiment was to extract and identify several compounds from a St. John’s wort sample using different solvents. We used capsules of the plant sold at a store and four different solvents: methylene chlorate, ethanol, ethyl acetate and ether. Our process involved using a gas chromatographer and mass spectrometry.

Comments

The faculty supervisor for this project is Barry Herron, Chemistry.

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Apr 28th, 11:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:45 PM

Analysis of Saint John’s Wort Composition with Four Different Solvents: Methylene Chloride, Ethanol, Ethyl Acetate and Ether

CoLab, OCB 100

Hypericum Perforatum is a medicinal plant with a beautiful yellow flower, native to Europe and most commonly known as St. John’s Wort. This plant has been used for hundreds of years, dating back all the way to the Greek era. It was used as a remedy for cuts, inflammation, bacterial and viral diseases. However, St. Jon’s Wort is most famously known today as a natural antidepressant. St. John’s Wort is used to treat mild to moderate depression. The main active compounds are hypericin and hyperforin. The purpose of this experiment was to extract and identify several compounds from a St. John’s wort sample using different solvents. We used capsules of the plant sold at a store and four different solvents: methylene chlorate, ethanol, ethyl acetate and ether. Our process involved using a gas chromatographer and mass spectrometry.