Event Title

New Antibiotic Discovery in Farm Soil

Location

CoLab, OCB 100

Start Date

28-4-2017 11:00 AM

End Date

28-4-2017 12:45 PM

Document Type

Poster

Description

The ESKAPE pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) have been responsible for a vast majority of hospital infections. Treatment to these bacteria have become difficult because of the severe antibiotic resistance. Today microbiologists around the world are trying to defeat this outbreak before all the options are drained. To help fight against these pathogens, I extracted farm soil that has been previously fertilized, diluted it, and grew it on a 50% tryptic soy agar. I then proceeded to test my candidates against all of the ESKAPE pathogen relatives and recorded any inhibition. One of my candidates showed inhibition to Bacillus subtilis and another to Micrococcus luteus. I believe my antibiotic is different from the others because it was grown on farm land, which has been exposed to several different chemicals and weather conditions. I think my candidates can be a positive step towards finding a new antibiotic to help fight against the deadly ESKAPE pathogens.

Comments

The faculty supervisor on this project is Heather Seitz, Biology.

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Apr 28th, 11:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:45 PM

New Antibiotic Discovery in Farm Soil

CoLab, OCB 100

The ESKAPE pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) have been responsible for a vast majority of hospital infections. Treatment to these bacteria have become difficult because of the severe antibiotic resistance. Today microbiologists around the world are trying to defeat this outbreak before all the options are drained. To help fight against these pathogens, I extracted farm soil that has been previously fertilized, diluted it, and grew it on a 50% tryptic soy agar. I then proceeded to test my candidates against all of the ESKAPE pathogen relatives and recorded any inhibition. One of my candidates showed inhibition to Bacillus subtilis and another to Micrococcus luteus. I believe my antibiotic is different from the others because it was grown on farm land, which has been exposed to several different chemicals and weather conditions. I think my candidates can be a positive step towards finding a new antibiotic to help fight against the deadly ESKAPE pathogens.