Event Title

Creating an Antibiotic from Animal Hospital Clay Soil

Location

CoLab, OCB 100

Start Date

28-4-2017 11:00 AM

End Date

28-4-2017 12:45 PM

Document Type

Poster

Description

Have you or anyone you’ve met over the course of your life contract a disease that is antibiotic resistant? Approximately two million people in the United States become infected with bacteria that is antibiotic resistance each year. Hopefully, with the help of my soil I collected from the hospital I work at, I can grow, plate, and culture a potential bacterium that produces an antibiotic. The goal is to find bacteria in our soil that will create an antibiotic that isn’t resistant to the ESKAPE pathogens (antibiotic resistant diseases. Fortunately, there have been many successful colonies that I have been able to patch plate and proof plate. Proof plating showed a few candidates with zones of inhibition that could further my research to streak plating. So far, I have found zones of inhibition and resistance with two of my bacteria with Staphylococcus epidermidis. The work I have put in this semester is just a miniscule amount of what is needed to find an antibiotic, but for my future data, I hope to find pure cultures, and sequence my pure culture colonies to find more positive information regarding antibiotic resistance.

Comments

The faculty supervisor on this project is Heather Seitz, Biology.

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Apr 28th, 11:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:45 PM

Creating an Antibiotic from Animal Hospital Clay Soil

CoLab, OCB 100

Have you or anyone you’ve met over the course of your life contract a disease that is antibiotic resistant? Approximately two million people in the United States become infected with bacteria that is antibiotic resistance each year. Hopefully, with the help of my soil I collected from the hospital I work at, I can grow, plate, and culture a potential bacterium that produces an antibiotic. The goal is to find bacteria in our soil that will create an antibiotic that isn’t resistant to the ESKAPE pathogens (antibiotic resistant diseases. Fortunately, there have been many successful colonies that I have been able to patch plate and proof plate. Proof plating showed a few candidates with zones of inhibition that could further my research to streak plating. So far, I have found zones of inhibition and resistance with two of my bacteria with Staphylococcus epidermidis. The work I have put in this semester is just a miniscule amount of what is needed to find an antibiotic, but for my future data, I hope to find pure cultures, and sequence my pure culture colonies to find more positive information regarding antibiotic resistance.