Event Title

Soil is Bacteria's Playground

Location

CoLab, OCB 100

Start Date

28-4-2017 11:00 AM

End Date

28-4-2017 12:45 PM

Document Type

Poster

Description

Antibiotic resistance has become a serious problem for humans. Many years of overuse and misuse have made bacteria resistant to many of the antibiotic that helped for many years. To find and produce new drugs that are effective has been difficult and expensive. My research is using soil samples to search for new possibilities of antibiotics. Bacteria live almost everywhere and they thrive in many places, including soil. I’m sure most of us can remember eating mud pies as children. Well, playing in that bacteria playground helped our immune system learn to fight. I am hoping those mud pies will help me find the next big thing to help with the stubborn Gram negative strands of bacteria that impact so many of us, and our loved ones, every day. I have used a soil sample from a local park that has shown great potential. I have four candidates that have shown some resistance to relatives of Pseudomonas putita, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. I take this work personally, having a child that has fought through many Gram negative infections. Like Fleming and others like him, I hope to find an antibiotic that helps for generations to come!

Comments

The faculty supervisor on this project is Heather Seitz, Biology.

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Apr 28th, 11:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:45 PM

Soil is Bacteria's Playground

CoLab, OCB 100

Antibiotic resistance has become a serious problem for humans. Many years of overuse and misuse have made bacteria resistant to many of the antibiotic that helped for many years. To find and produce new drugs that are effective has been difficult and expensive. My research is using soil samples to search for new possibilities of antibiotics. Bacteria live almost everywhere and they thrive in many places, including soil. I’m sure most of us can remember eating mud pies as children. Well, playing in that bacteria playground helped our immune system learn to fight. I am hoping those mud pies will help me find the next big thing to help with the stubborn Gram negative strands of bacteria that impact so many of us, and our loved ones, every day. I have used a soil sample from a local park that has shown great potential. I have four candidates that have shown some resistance to relatives of Pseudomonas putita, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. I take this work personally, having a child that has fought through many Gram negative infections. Like Fleming and others like him, I hope to find an antibiotic that helps for generations to come!