Event Title

Combatting Antibiotic Resistance with Backyard Soil

Location

CoLab, OCB 100

Start Date

28-4-2017 1:00 PM

End Date

28-4-2017 2:45 PM

Document Type

Poster

Description

My research this semester has been based around discovering an antibiotic grown from soil that helps combat antibiotic resistance. To do this I began by obtaining a soil sample from my backyard. What makes this soil sample unique is it was taken from a backyard that recently had lots of yard work done to it. The soil had been freshly dug from deep in the ground; therefore, it is from deeper in the earth than the typical soil sample. To begin my research I measured out one gram of the soil and depending on the desired concentration would put in an amount of water. I had the most success rates with the 10-4 and 10-5 concentration. A successful sample would be one that exhibited “zones of inhibition.” I would next take the samples that had created zone of inhibition and create a patch plate. After this I would create proof plates. I used the Caviler method to this. If my candidate created another zone of inhibition I would consider that a successful candidate and would create a fresh streak plate and work through the process again. I had most success with candidates: one, five, and seven. In the end my number seven candidate made it through all the tests and successfully inhibited Enterococcus faecium. Antibiotic resistance is a serious problem and my research helps further our knowledge about it as well as creates ways to fight it.

Comments

The faculty supervisor on this project is Heather Seitz, Biology.

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Apr 28th, 1:00 PM Apr 28th, 2:45 PM

Combatting Antibiotic Resistance with Backyard Soil

CoLab, OCB 100

My research this semester has been based around discovering an antibiotic grown from soil that helps combat antibiotic resistance. To do this I began by obtaining a soil sample from my backyard. What makes this soil sample unique is it was taken from a backyard that recently had lots of yard work done to it. The soil had been freshly dug from deep in the ground; therefore, it is from deeper in the earth than the typical soil sample. To begin my research I measured out one gram of the soil and depending on the desired concentration would put in an amount of water. I had the most success rates with the 10-4 and 10-5 concentration. A successful sample would be one that exhibited “zones of inhibition.” I would next take the samples that had created zone of inhibition and create a patch plate. After this I would create proof plates. I used the Caviler method to this. If my candidate created another zone of inhibition I would consider that a successful candidate and would create a fresh streak plate and work through the process again. I had most success with candidates: one, five, and seven. In the end my number seven candidate made it through all the tests and successfully inhibited Enterococcus faecium. Antibiotic resistance is a serious problem and my research helps further our knowledge about it as well as creates ways to fight it.