Event Title

Discovering Antibiotics for Antibiotic Resistant Pathogens

Location

CoLab, OCB 100

Start Date

28-4-2017 1:00 PM

End Date

28-4-2017 2:45 PM

Document Type

Poster

Description

Potentially ground breaking research is underway at Johnson County Community College. Local Kansas soil samples have been diluted and tested in hopes of finding a microorganism capable of curing some of the most mysteriously antibiotic resistant pathogens known to human kind. These pathogens affect a wide range of people, all ages, and are often times lethal. Finding successful treatments have stumped those working in this field. Using aseptic technique in a controlled lab setting, samples of microorganisms that live in the diluted soil have been plated on agar media to form a patch plate. Colonies of bacteria were grown on this plate after a period of incubation. Through a series of patch-patch plate trials plated against the various ESKAPE pathogens, the colonies that exhibited zones of inhibition were then used to make streak plates so that pure culture could be formed of that potential candidate. Through this research, I hope to show that the candidates I have found are unique in that they could potentially contribute to a possible cure of at least one of the ESKAPE pathogens. I hope that my research and findings may further advance modern medicine and minimize the lethality of untreatable disease.

Comments

The faculty supervisor on this project is Heather Seitz, Biology.

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Apr 28th, 1:00 PM Apr 28th, 2:45 PM

Discovering Antibiotics for Antibiotic Resistant Pathogens

CoLab, OCB 100

Potentially ground breaking research is underway at Johnson County Community College. Local Kansas soil samples have been diluted and tested in hopes of finding a microorganism capable of curing some of the most mysteriously antibiotic resistant pathogens known to human kind. These pathogens affect a wide range of people, all ages, and are often times lethal. Finding successful treatments have stumped those working in this field. Using aseptic technique in a controlled lab setting, samples of microorganisms that live in the diluted soil have been plated on agar media to form a patch plate. Colonies of bacteria were grown on this plate after a period of incubation. Through a series of patch-patch plate trials plated against the various ESKAPE pathogens, the colonies that exhibited zones of inhibition were then used to make streak plates so that pure culture could be formed of that potential candidate. Through this research, I hope to show that the candidates I have found are unique in that they could potentially contribute to a possible cure of at least one of the ESKAPE pathogens. I hope that my research and findings may further advance modern medicine and minimize the lethality of untreatable disease.